CAPE PETREL

CAPE PETREL (Daption capense) – (See images below)

The Cape Petrel is a very common seabird of the Antarctic Ocean and its wing span is around three feet. Its main food is made of crustaceans. Those birds were photographed during the seabird expedition off Kaikoura Peninsula on the South Island.

NOTES: Petrels are part of an order of birds that includes seabirds with a ‘tubenose’ bill. This highly specialized bill is made of plates and the nostrils are inside one of them in the shape of a ‘tube’. These birds drink seawater, and they have glands in their bill to extract the salt from the water. Their nostrils also have a self-defensive feature – when threatened they can spit out a foul-smelling oil from that organ.

Cape petrel. Note the wing tips crossing over the tail. Kaikoura Peninsula offshore, South Island, New Zealand.
Cape petrel. Note the wing tips crossing over the tail. Kaikoura Peninsula offshore, South Island, New Zealand.
Cape petrels have a black beak, head and neck. Compare their size to that of the Southern Giant Petrel on the right. Off Kaikoura Peninsula, South Island, New Zealand.
Cape petrels have a black beak, head and neck. Compare their size to that of the Southern Giant Petrel on the right. Off Kaikoura Peninsula, South Island, New Zealand.

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