BIRDING ON HAWAII

Here are some locations where the birds on this website were found:

OAHU:
Fort DeRussy Beach Park (part of the Fort DeRussy Military Reservation) in Waikiki, Oahu
Ala Moana Beach Park near Waikiki, Oahu
Diamond Head State Monument: The hike at Diamond Head is VERY popular with tourists as it is easy to do and close to Honolulu. It is also an area where the following birds can be observed (in addition to that list I also took photos and videos of Common Waxbills in tall grasses along the trail near the base, and of Japanese White-eyes in Coral trees in front of the entrance building):

About 10 bird species can be observed at Diamond Head. Hawaii DLNR - Photo taken Jan. 31, 2014
About 10 bird species can be observed at Diamond Head. Hawaii DLNR – Photo taken Jan. 31, 2014

Makapuʻu Point State Wayside (this habitat is windy and dry, and provided the wind conditions are right, it’s a good location to observe the Great Frigatebird). It is located on the east shore not too far from Honolulu.
Kaena Point State Park; in addition to being a state park, Kaena Point (westernmost tip of Oahu) is also a Natural Area Reserve, complete with high fencing and double doors to keep off bird predators such as rats and mongoose. This is the best spot to observe the Laysan Albatross. Kaena Point can be accessed by foot trail both from the north shore or the west side. The hike on the north shore is easier, and both are around the same length.

Seabirds that can be seen at Kaena Point, Oahu, HI - Dec. 29, 2013 - © Denise Motard
Seabirds that can be seen at Kaena Point, Oahu, HI – Dec. 29, 2013 – © Denise Motard
Laysan Albatros with egg - Kaena Point, Oahu
Laysan Albatros with egg – Kaena Point, Oahu
Double gate and fence at Kaena Point Coastal Reserve, Oahu, Hawaii - Note the shoe brush at the outside entrance (from the west side).
Double gate and fence at Kaena Point Coastal Reserve, Oahu, Hawaii – Note the shoe brush at the outside entrance (from the west side).

The Kawainui-Hamakua Marsh Complex: at over 800 acres on the Oahu east shore, this wetland is the largest in Hawaii. In addition to its historical and cultural importance, this easily accessible marsh is where one can observe the endangered Hawaiian Stilt (Ae’o), Hawaiian Coot (Alae Ke’oke’o) and Hawaiian Gallinule (Alae’ula). The photos below were taken at the access point in Kailua.
RAMSAR: This is an international organization for the conservation of wetlands. The Kawainui-Hamakua Marsh Complex is listed on their website.

Formation of Hamakua Marsh - Kailua, Oahu - Feb. 13, 2014 - photo by Denise Motard
Formation of Hamakua Marsh – Kailua, Oahu – Feb. 13, 2014 – photo by Denise Motard
Hamakua Marsh is a RAMSAR wetland - Kailua, Oahu - Feb. 13, 2014 - photo by Denise Motard
Hamakua Marsh is a RAMSAR wetland – Kailua, Oahu – Feb. 13, 2014 – photo by Denise Motard
Endangered birds that can be seen at Hamakua Marsh - Kailua, Oahu - Feb. 13,.2014 - photo by Denise Motard
Endangered birds (except the Black-crowned Night Heron) that can be seen at Hamakua Marsh – Kailua, Oahu – Feb. 13,.2014 – photo by Denise Motard
Hawaiian gallinules foraging in the water - Hamakua Marsh, Kailua, Oahu
Hawaiian gallinules foraging in the water – Hamakua Marsh, Kailua, Oahu
Hamakua Marsh is a wildlife sanctuary - Kailua, Oahu - Feb. 13,.2014 - photo by Denise Motard
Hamakua Marsh is a wildlife sanctuary – Kailua, Oahu – Feb. 13,.2014 – photo by Denise Motard
Hawaiian stilts also have a long, slender bill - Hamakua Marsh, Kailua, Oahu
Hawaiian stilts also have a long, slender bill – Hamakua Marsh, Kailua, Oahu

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BIG ISLAND:

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Hawaii State Parks are located in various bird habitats and many species can be observed in those publicly accessible areas.
The State of Hawaii also has a Natural Area Reserve system, consisting of 21 reserves on the five main islands. They are located in various habitats and publicly accessible for free as well. For more information on what is accessible, please check the Nā Ala Hele Trail & Access Program.
Most of the birds shown on this website for the state of Hawaii are easy to find. Some inhabit cities, others can be seen in parks and along trails, or in publicly accessible refuges, reserves or sanctuaries. Some are introduced, others are endemic.
There is a choice of birding tours available in the Hawaiian Islands, for various levels of birding. Some are free and organized by non-profits. Many endemic species are rare, and can only be observed in mountainous forests at high elevations.

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